Alcohol Metabolism, Methanol Poisoning, Fatty Change Alcoholic Hypoglycemia Fomepazole

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http://www.stomponstep1.com/alcohol-metabolism-methanol-poisoning-fatty-change/

Ethanol is relatively harmless when consumed in small amounts, but problems can arise when alcohol is consumed in excess. When alcohol is consumed in large quantities Acetaldehyde, an intermediate of alcohol metabolism, builds up faster than it can be metabolized. This excess Acetaldehyde contributes to hangover symptoms.

When alcohol is consumed in excess the NADH generated from alcohol metabolism can also cause many health effects. This buildup of NADH can be exacerbated when large quantities of alcohol are consumed without food being consumed. NADH is an electron transporter. Its presence signals liver cells that there is ample energy present. The presence of this signal leads to increased breakdown of glucose (Glycolysis), decreased creation of glucose (Gluconeogenesis), and decreased fat breakdown (Fat Oxidation). NADH is also used to convert Pyruvate to Lactate, which means high levels of NADH leads to increased Anaerobic Glycolysis and Lactic Acidosis.

Alcoholism can also cause Traumatic Injuries Due to Falls or Esophageal Tears due to frequent vomiting. Alcoholism is also associated with many health outcomes which I will cover in other sections. Wernicke-Korsakoff, thiamine deficiency, is common among alcoholics, because alcoholics sometimes get a majority of their calories from alcohol. Excessive alcohol intake is also associated with Pancreatitis. Chronic steatosis can lead to liver inflammation (“non-viral” Hepatitis) and eventually Liver Cirrhosis. Unlike viral hepatitis, inflammation due to alcohol usually presents with an AST Elevated More than ALT. I remember this by thinking Alcohol –) Steatosis –) Higher AST. Excessive alcohol consumption by pregnant woman can also lead to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and mental retardation.

Alcohol Withdrawal must be watched carefully in any hospitalized patients with a history of alcoholism as it can be life threatening. It usually occurs a couple days after abrupt cessation of alcohol (usually in the hospital where alcohol is not accessible). Mild withdrawal may present as Agitation or aggression a couple days after being brought into the hospital. Severe withdrawal can include Tremors, Seizures, confusion, and psychosis. This collection of symptoms is referred to as Delirium Tremens (DTs). Treatment for DTs is Benzos.

The best type of treatment for alcoholism is a 12 step program like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). In some patients, Disulfiram is also used. This drug Inhibits Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase and makes patients very sick if they drink any alcohol as Acetaldehyde builds up much faster. You are essentially giving them a really bad hangover on purpose to dissuade them from drinking. However, this it is not always effective as there is relatively low compliance for this drug. Patients considering drinking can think ahead and easily not take their medication to avoid the consequences. Disulfiram intentionally causes these hangover like symptoms after alcohol consumption, but other drugs (such as Metronidazole) inadvertently have this same effect. Drugs with this type of side effect are often described as having a Disulfiram-Like effect.

Methanol is in antifreeze, paint thinner and improperly prepared moonshine (illegally produced spirits). It can accidentally be consumed by children or adults mistaking the liquid for ethanol. Methanol itself does not cause problems, but after being metabolized by Alcohol Dehydrogenase Formaldehyde is formed. Formaldehyde can cause blindness and death so treatment focuses on preventing aldehyde formation. Fomepizole Inhibits Alcohol Dehydrogenase decreasing the amount of methanol that is metabolized into Formaldehyde. Alcohol can also be given as it utilizes the same enzyme and will compete for alcohol dehydrogenase.

Now that you are finished with this video you should check out the next video in the Biochemistry section which covers Chediak-Higashi, I-Cell Disease & Kartagner’s Disease (http://www.stomponstep1.com/chediak-higashi-i-cell-disease-kartageners-disease/)

Pictures Used (In order of Appearance)
• This work is a derivative of “Bottle Beer Bottle Alcohol Drinking” available at http://pixabay.com/en/bottle-beer-bottle-alcohol-drinking-157844/ under Creative Commons 1.0 Public Domain Dedication
• This work is a derivative of “Liver steatosis fatty change” available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Liver_steatosis_fatty_change.jpg under Public Domain
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Thank you for listening to my story. This is one of the hardest videos I have filmed but I am hoping to help someone out there and let others know that they are not alone. Thank you for your support. Love you guys from the bottom of my heart.

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Dr. Robinson on Alcohol Poisoning

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Dr. Robinson on Alcohol Poisoning

Dr. Spencer Robinson of Palmetto Health talks about the process of a patient dying from Alcohol poisoning.
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This video is was created by Off Campus Life and GatorWell in an effort to educate students about what to do when someone is experiencing alcohol poisoning. First and foremost never hesitate to call 911 if you are concerned someone is experiencing alcohol poisoning or overdose. Watch the video for a full explanation of symptoms and steps to take. For other alcohol safety tips, please check out our Party Safety video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XjeFxKq3eo&feature=youtu.be

Alcohol Poisoning (FSC)

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Subject: Forensic Science
Paper: Forensic Toxicology
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Benedictine University Police “Sobering Moments” – Alcohol Poisoning

Every year, more than 50,000 people suffer from alcohol overdose, also known as alcohol poisoning. That’s when a person consumes more alcohol than their body can break down. Every year, 50 people lose their lives to alcohol poisoning, many of them college-aged people.

Don’t let your friends become a statistic. You might just save a life.

http://www.ben.edu
http://www.ben.edu/police

How to Recognize and Treat Alcohol Poisoning

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How to Recognize and Treat Alcohol Poisoning

How to Recognize and Treat Alcohol Poisoning

Many people enjoy having an alcoholic beverage or beverages on occasion, but consuming too many drinks in a short period of time can lead to alcohol poisoning.1 This condition can affect your body’s ability to function properly and may even cause death.2 But by identifying and treating a case of alcohol poisoning and drinking responsibly, you can avoid serious health consequences or even death.

Identifying Alcohol Poisoning Be aware of your risk for alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning can happen as a result of binge drinking, which is consuming at least four drinks for women and five for men within two hours. However, certain factors can increase your risk for developing the condition. These include: Your size, weight, and overall health If you’ve had anything to eat recently Drug use Alcohol percentage in your beverages Frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption Your tolerance level, which can drop dangerously if the temperature is high, you are dehydrated or have been exerting yourself physically Your size, weight, and overall healthIf you’ve had anything to eat recentlyDrug useAlcohol percentage in your beveragesFrequency and quantity of alcohol consumptionYour tolerance level, which can drop dangerously if the temperature is high, you are dehydrated or have been exerting yourself physicallyWatch consumption rates.

Pay attention to how much you or a friend is drinking as much as possible. This may help you more easily identify the signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning, inform medical personnel, or even minimize the risk of getting the condition. One drink equals: 12 ounces 355 ml of regular beer containing about 5% alcohol8-9 ounces 237-266 ml of malt liquor containing about 7% alcohol5 ounces 148 ml of wine containing about 12% alcohol1.5 ounces 44ml of 80-proof hard liquor containing about 40% alcohol. Examples of hard liquor include gin, rum, tequila, whiskey, and vodka. Obs Many people enjoy having an alcoholic beverage or beverages on occasion, but consuming too many drinks in a short period of time can lead to alcohol poisoning.1 This condition can affect your body’s ability to function properly and may even cause death.2 But by identifying and treating a case of alcohol poisoning and drinking responsibly, you can avoid serious health consequences or even death.

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This video is shown in a storytelling way and has information on how a person can get alcohol poisoning, as well as tips on how to help them. If you suspect someone has alcohol poisoning please get help, you could save a life!

I wanted to make this video for the SoberingUp organization/SCRAM Systems

How to Detect the Signs & Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

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Watch more How to Handle a Medical Problem videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/262769-How-to-Detect-the-Signs-and-Symptoms-of-Alcohol-Poisoning

Step 1: Notice vomiting
Take note if the victim is vomiting. Although it could be an upset stomach, it could also indicate a more serious problem.

Step 2: Wake the victim
Attempt to wake the victim if they pass out. If they cannot be roused, immediately seek help.

Tip
Watch an unconscious victim to make sure they don’t choke on their vomit.

Step 3: Listen to breathing
Listen for slow or irregular breathing. Eight breaths per minute or less is considered slow.

Step 4: Check for hypothermia
Check to see if the victim has blue or pale skin or low body temperature, as these can be signs of hypothermia.

Step 5: Watch for seizures
Watch for seizures, which are caused by either dehydration or hyperglycemia.

Step 6: Call for help
Call the hospital or poison control if you suspect the victim has alcohol poisoning. Don’t wait for all the symptoms to appear before calling for help.

Did You Know?
Each year an estimated 1,700 college students ages die from alcohol-related injuries.

EMS Alcohol Poisoning Treatment | DT's

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http://turbomedic.com This weeks Minutes I point out some key signs and symptoms along with suggested EMS treatment for acute alcohol intoxicated patients. I also include withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. http://youtu.be/gCv0wk8mUE8
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